ICE removes Honduran man wanted for murder

On July 31, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers removed an unlawfully present Honduran man wanted by Honduran law enforcement authorities for murder.


On July 31, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers removed an unlawfully present Honduran man wanted by Honduran law enforcement authorities for murder.

Saudiel Doblado Carias, 28, was removed to Honduras on an ICE Air charter where he was handed over to Honduran authorities.

Officers from the ERO Washington, D.C. field office arrested Doblado March 10 at his home near Charlottesville, Virginia. Doblado entered the U.S. in 2013 near Mission, Texas, and an immigration judge ordered his removal April 15, 2015, after he did not appear for his immigration hearing.

On Sept. 25, 2015, the Honduran government issued an arrest warrant for Doblado for murder.

ICE has removed hundreds of thousands of criminal aliens, some of whom fall under the category of high-profile removals, since the agency was established in March 2003.

“ICE is committed to removing fugitive aliens charged with crimes in their home countries so they may face justice,” said Acting Washington Field Office Director Lyle Boelens. “We are grateful to our law enforcement partners at home and abroad for their assistance in our shared public safety mission.”

High-profile removals include those who are wanted for a crime in another country, such as murder, rape, sexual abuse of a minor, drug offenses, alien smuggling, fraud or theft. Others include persons who are national security risks, such as suspected terrorists, those involved in counter-proliferation crimes or those on the terrorist watch list and/or the no-fly list, along with human rights or war crimes violators.

ICE removed or returned 267,000 aliens in fiscal year 2019. In FY 2019, 86 percent of ERO’s administrative arrests consisted of aliens with criminal convictions or pending criminal charges.

ICE is focused on removing public safety threats, such as convicted criminal aliens and gang members, as well as individuals who have violated our nation’s immigration laws, including those who illegally reentered the country after being removed and immigration fugitives ordered removed by federal immigration judges.

Members of the public who have information about foreign fugitives are urged to contact ICE by calling the ICE Tip Line at 1 (866) 347-2423 or internationally at 001-1802-872-6199. They can also file a tip online by completing ICE’s online tip form.

Blogs to Follow:

ICE.gov (August 2020) ICE removes Honduran man wanted for murder

CISA Releases Guide for America’s Election Administrators

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) released the Guide to Vulnerability Reporting for America’s Election Administrators. The guide walks election officials through the steps of establishing a vulnerability disclosure program.


Federal authorities say one of the gravest threats to the November election is a well-timed ransomware attack that could paralyze voting operations. The threat isn’t just from foreign governments, but any fortune-seeking criminal.

As a result, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) released the Guide to Vulnerability Reporting for America’s Election Administrators. The guide walks election officials through the steps of establishing a vulnerability disclosure program. 

Vulnerability disclosures can be an effective way for organizations to benefit from cybersecurity expertise without having it resident to their organization.  

CISA released two new assessments and infographics on Election Infrastructure Cyber Risk and Mail-in Voting in 2020 Infrastructure Risk.

Each method of voting carries risk that you, as election officials, manage.

These assessments and infographics are voluntary resources intended to help the Federal Government and election officials understand and manage risks to election infrastructure and operations.

“Election officials have spent years beefing up security to their systems and closing these vulnerability gaps to keep our elections safe and secure,” said CISA Director Christopher Krebs. “Cybersecurity researchers can be great and responsible partners in this effort and we are creating this guide as a way to help state and local election officials understand the support they can offer and how to work with them in our collective, whole of nation effort to protect our elections.”  

The guide aims to help election officials understand the role that the cybersecurity research community can play in helping officials keep systems secure so that the American public’s voice can be clearly heard.

The guide includes a number of best practices for improving and addressing vulnerabilities within election systems, and offers a step-by-step guide for election administrators who seek to establish a successful vulnerability disclosure program.  

Accordingly, an electoral process that is both secure and resilient is a vital national interest and one of CISA’s highest priorities.

CISA is committed to working collaboratively with those on the front lines of elections—state and local governments, election officials, federal partners, and vendors—to manage risks to the Nation’s election infrastructure. CISA will remain transparent and agile in its vigorous efforts to secure America’s election infrastructure from new and evolving threats.

While ultimate responsibility for administering the Nation’s elections rests with state and local governments, CISA offers a variety of free services to help states ensure both the physical security and cybersecurity of their elections infrastructure.

Additionally, election infrastructure’s critical infrastructure designation enables CISA to provide services on a prioritized basis at the request of state and local elections officials.

Blogs to Follow:

CISA.gov (August 2020) CISA RELEASES GUIDE TO VULNERABILITY REPORTING FOR AMERICA’S ELECTION ADMINISTRATORS; ELECTION INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY